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How to Apply for a Government Grant to Rebuild a Termite Eaten Home

The only place you should look for government grants is the government. There are a bunch of third party services that promise to find any grant you're looking for, but they mainly just want your money. Applying for a government grant is free. You shouldn't have to pay a dime.


Termite infestation can severely damage your home
  1. Go to grants.gov and register for an account. You will have to choose whether you want to apply for an individual account or a business account. If you own a business, you will be eligible for a business account, but you won't be able to search for individual grants. If you already have an account, you'll only need to login to begin looking for grants.
  2. Click on the "Grant Search" link on the right hand rail on the homepage. You will have the option to search by keyword, CFDA number, Agency and Funding Opportunity number. If you know the exact grant you would like to apply for, you can enter the CFDA number and locate it. If you don't have a clue as to what grant you want to apply for, you will have to do a general search.
  3. Select to search by agency and click on either the Corporation for National and Community Service or the Department of Housing and Urban Development link for grants relating to termite damaged home repair. Search through the available grants and see if you can find one that pertains to you. New grants come in all the time, so if you can't find a grant for you, don't get discouraged, just check back in a few days.
  4. Click on the grant you would like apply for. You will be brought to a description page that will tell you all the requirements for the grant. If you're eligible, download the grant application package and fill it out. Once you double check that it is filled out correctly, you can submit it to the site. It may take a while to hear back from anybody, but you can track the status of your application with the "Track Application" feature.

About the Author

Michael Jones reported campus news stories for The University of Southern California's student newspaper, "The Daily Trojan," for four years before graduating Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science in journalism. He has since gone on to write for several publications both in America and abroad and has an idiosyncratic knack for translating the most intricate tasks into layman speak.

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