How to Install a Game Fence

A game fence is a fence constructed for the purpose of keeping game animals in or out of an area.

A game fence will keep game in or out of an area.A game fence will keep game in or out of an area.
A typical modern use of such a fence is to contain deer or elk for ranching, to create a hunting preserve or for conservation purposes. In the past, game fences were used to help hunters trap large game animals such as moose and caribou in areas where the animals could more easily be killed.

Clear a wide strip along the intended fence line. Remove rocks, trees and other debris that might interfere with the fence. The cleared area should be wide enough to allow for access to the fence once it is completed.

Dig post holes for each wooden post. Holes should be 3 feet deep and large enough in diameter to allow for the use of gravel to set the posts. Exact spacing of the posts will depend on the terrain, but in general posts should be 24 feet apart.

Set one post in each hole. Mix gravel and water with some of the dirt that has been removed from each hole and fill in around each post. Use the level to insure posts are vertical. Tamp down the soil around each post with a metal rod.

Brace fence corners by setting posts 8 feet from each corner, following the fence line. Nail an 8-foot post as a cross beam from the corner post to the two wooden posts, placing the cross beam horizontally about 2 feet down from the top of each post.

Lay the roll of fence down at one corner, and unroll it along the fence line until you reach the end of the roll or until you come to a corner.

Stand the fence up and use fence staples to securely attach it to the post, starting with the first corner. Place a staple on every strand or every other strand of the fencing wires.

Use the fence stretcher to pull the fence tight along an entire section. Hammer in fence staples to attach the wire securely to each post. Repeat this process until the entire area is fenced.

Things You Will Need

  • 11-foot-long, 6-inch-diameter pressure-treated wooden posts
  • Post hole digger
  • Gravel
  • Water
  • Rod
  • Level
  • 8-foot-long, 4-inch-diameter pressure-treated wooden posts
  • 6-inch nails
  • Hammer
  • 8-foot deer fence
  • Fence staples
  • Fence stretcher
  • Eye protection

Tip

  • Game fence can also be installed using metal T-posts in place of some of the wooden posts. For best results, alternate metal and wooden posts the entire length of the fence, but use wood only for corners and other areas which need to be braced.

Warning

  • Tools can be hazardous. Use caution when working with post hole diggers and fence stretchers. Get help lifting heavy materials such as fencing and posts to prevent possible injury. Wear eye protection when working with items such as nails which could injure the eyes.