How to Put Up Mailbox Post Spikes

Mailbox posts allow your mailbox to be installed near the curb, so that the mail can be delivered without the carrier leaving the car.

Installing the Spike

Use a sledge hammer to drive the post spike into the ground.Use a sledge hammer to drive the post spike into the ground.
The posts can be installed in a variety of ways. The simplest method is to use a post-spike base that drives into the ground and holds the post upright. Since the bottom of the post will be at ground level, it will need to be cut to the height you desire before mounting, as opposed to a post set in a hole, which requires the extra length.

Measure from the top of your post and cut it so that the bottom of your mailbox will be 36-inches high, using a circular saw. Save the cut-off piece to use as a pounding block for installing the spike.

Select the spot you want your mailbox installed. Position the point of the spike on the spot, with the bracket aligned so that the post will sit square. Fit the offcut piece of four-by-four into the bracket and drive the spike into the ground with a sledge hammer about six inches.

Set a level on the off-cut post piece and lean the spike as needed to level it. Check it front-to-back and side-to-side. Drive the spike in the rest of the way, until the bottom of the spike is completely flush with the ground.

Installing the Post

Fit the mailbox post into the bracket. Mark the bolt holes through the bracket onto the post. Remove the post and drill 1/4-inch holes, three inches deep. Fit the post back into the bracket.

Drive one three-inch-by-5/16-inch lag bolt through each hole in the bracket into the mailbox post using a socket wrench. Tighten the bolts until the head presses firmly against the face of the bracket. Repeat for each bolt.

Tamp the dirt around the stake bracket by dropping the head of the sledge hammer onto the ground, packing it down.

Things You Will Need

  • Tape measure
  • Circular saw
  • Spiked post bracket
  • Sledge hammer
  • Drill
  • Lag bolts
  • Socket wrench

About the Author

Mark Morris started writing professionally in 1995. He has published a novel and stage plays with SEEDS studio. Morris specializes in many topics and has 15 years of professional carpentry experience. He is a voice, acting and film teacher. He also teaches stage craft and lectures on playwriting for Oklahoma Christian University.