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How to Make a T-Ball Stand With PVC

T-ball, a sport enjoyed by young children across the United States, involves a baseball-style setting and includes a pole at home plate that holds the ball in place, enabling small children to easily hit it. With minimal skills, you can use PVC pipe to construct your own inexpensive T-ball stand in a few hours.

T-ball stands allow small children to hit a stationary baseball.

T-ball, a sport enjoyed by young children across the United States, involves a baseball-style setting and includes a pole at home plate that holds the ball in place, enabling small children to easily hit it. With minimal skills, you can use PVC pipe to construct your own inexpensive T-ball stand in a few hours.

  1. Place the section of plywood on a flat surface. Place one end of the chalk line at the top right corner and the opposite end at the bottom left. Snap the chalk line to form a diagonal line. Then place one end of the chalk line on the top left corner and the opposite end at the bottom right corner. Snap the line to form an X in the center of the plywood.

  2. Line up the floor flange to the center of the plywood. Drive one 1/2" screw through each hole in the flange to secure it to the plywood.

  3. Apply a thick layer of rubber cement around the entire inner lip of the flange. Apply additional rubber cement around an inch at one end of the 1-1/4" diameter PVC pipe. Insert the glued end of the 1-1/4" diameter pipe inside the floor flange. Allow the rubber cement to dry for two hours before continuing.

  4. Place a 1" diameter PVC pipe inside the 1-1/4" diameter pipe. When you are ready to bat, simply place the plywood base over home plate with the pipes standing upright. Balance the ball on top of the one-inch diameter PVC pipe and swing away. Switch between the 24", 30" and 36" section of PVC depending on the height of the batter.

  5. Tip

    If you do not have a chalk line, measure nine inches along each edge of the plywood. Place a straightedge from the top edge to the bottom edge and draw a line. Repeat this at the center mark on the left and right hand side. The lines will cross in the middle, indicating the center location.

About the Author

Nicole Byerly has been writing since 2003. She has published multiple works that have appeared in "Campus Philly." Byerly is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in cybersecurity at Utica College.