×

How to Get Baseball Cards Unstuck

Baseball card collecting connects fans with their favorite players, and enthusiasts will go to great lengths to find that rare card. So enthusiasts and just the casual collector need to know how to protect and store their cards. Cards sometimes stick together which can be easily remedied with just a few easy steps.

Unsticking

Collecting baseball cards is an Amerian pasttime
  1. Use your nail to scrap off any debris from the outside of the cards.

  2. Rub the file with a wipe to wet it.

  3. Slowly slide the nail file in between the stuck cards. You also can use dental floss by tightly holding it and sliding between the cards.

  4. Separate the cards. Wipe them clean with a wipe. Scrape away any debris with your nail or the file.

Maintaining

  1. Clean the cards with a wet wipe. Do not soak the cards.

  2. Lay the cards out on a flat surface to dry completely. Putting wet cards together only causes sticking.

  3. Check the edges of the cards for tearing and splitting. Fix small splits by applying a thin layer of super glue to the inside of the split.

  4. Decide how you want to store your cards to protect them from damage.

Storage options

  1. If you use multiple card sleeves, put one card in each sleeve. Put the sleeves in a binder. The binder keeps the cards together and prevents light damage.

  2. Store the binder upright in a safe area. If the binder is laid flat, cards can spill out.

  3. Put each card in its own soft-sleeve. A soft-sleeve is made from clear plastic and protects the card from damage.

  4. Plastic screw-down cases are much thicker than sleeves. These types of cases usually are used for more valuable cards. These cases may need to be replaced if cracked or scratched.

  5. Combine the protection of soft-sleeves with top-loaders. Put the card in a soft sleeve and then inside a top-loader. Top-loaders are a little sturdier than the soft sleeve.

Warning

  • Do not put rubber bands around the cards. This causes bending.

About the Author

Racheal Ambrose started writing professionally in 2007. She has worked for the minority publishing company Elite Media Group Inc., Ball Bearings online magazine, "Ball State Daily News" and "The Herald Bulletin." Her articles focus on minority and women's issues, children, crafts, housekeeping and green living. Ambrose holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Ball State University.