How to Lock a Chain Link Gate

Chain link gates are commonly used in combination with chain link fences to provide a means of entering and leaving an enclosed area.

Secure a chain link gate with a length of chain and lock.Secure a chain link gate with a length of chain and lock.
Made of the same type metal tubing and mesh fencing used in chain link fences, these gates are available in various sizes to meet a range of needs. As this type of fencing and gate are often used to secure property, locking a chain link gate is usually necessary. Although there are many locking latches designed to be mounted on the gate itself, a secondary or more secure means of locking may be preferred.

Purchase a length of chain from a hardware, home or big box store. Purchase chain that cannot not easily break or be cut and will accept the hasp of a combination or keyed pad lock.

Close the chain link gate and secure any latches mounted to the gate. The mounted latches or locks should be closed and secured help provide maximum security.

Place one end of the chain through a gap in the chain link gate. Pull the chain behind the gate frame and across to the post of the fence. Continue pulling the chain behind the post and feed the end through a gap in the main chain link fencing.

Open the hasp of the padlock by dialing in the combination or turning the key. Hold the ends of the chain in your hands and pull tight. Over lap the chain pulling it tight against the gate and fence post.

Place the hasp of the lock through a link of both chains so that the overall chain will be tight against the fence and post. Snap the hasp into the body of the lock and pull down ward to make sure it is securely closed.

Things You Will Need

  • Length of chain (minimum 2 feet long)
  • Key or combination padlock
  • Chain link gate and fencing

Tip

  • Pulling the chain tight and securing with a lock as close as possible adds a level of security. The less movement possible between the gate and post the better. This will reduce the chances of someone slipping between the post and gate.

About the Author

Keith Dooley has a degree in outdoor education and sports management. He has worked as an assistant athletic director, head coach and assistant coach in various sports including football, softball and golf. Dooley has worked for various websites in the past, contributing instructional articles on a wide variety of topics.