How Do I Level a Ceiling Fan?

A ceiling fan may become unstable and wobble, make squeaking or groaning noises and become unlevel after several years of use.

Tighten all Screws

Screws may become loose and cause a wobbling motion in a ceiling fan.Screws may become loose and cause a wobbling motion in a ceiling fan.
The screws can work themselves loose in a ceiling fan due to the motion of constant turning and vibration of the motor. In addition, high humidity can cause ceiling fan blades to warp or turn inconsistently. No matter what the cause, you can easily fix it.

Turn the ceiling fan off. Use a screwdriver to tighten the screws that connect the fan to the ceiling. Turn the screwdriver clockwise to tighten.

Tighten the two screws that mount the blades to the ceiling fan motor housing. Turn the screws on each blade clockwise to tighten.

Tighten the three screws that mount the fan blades to the blade assembly. Turn each of the three screws clockwise to tighten.

Fan-Balancing Kit

Turn the ceiling fan on high and observe the blades for wobbles.

Turn the ceiling fan off and wait for it to stop turning. Clip a weight from the fan-balancing kit near the middle of one fan blade.

Turn the fan on high to see whether the fan rotates evenly and levelly. Turn the fan off.

Move the weight from blade to blade until the fan balances and the blades are level.

Peel the backing off a fan weight and stick it on top of the fan blade that the clip-on weight balanced.

Things You Will Need

  • Screwdriver
  • Fan-balancing kit

Tips

  • Tightening all screws on a ceiling fan may level the fan, remove squeaks and noises and allow the fan blades to turn level.
  • Turning a ceiling fan on high usually produces the most wobble to help you determine how to balance the blades to level the fan.
  • Fan-balancing kits are available at hardware stores, ceiling fan stores and home improvement centers.

Warning

  • Wait for a ceiling fan to stop rotating entirely before placing hands near the blades for adjustments. The blades are not sharp on the edges but still can cause bruises to hands and fingers.

About the Author

Mary Lougee has been writing since 2004 and specializes in pets with publications in "Modern Dog" and "Pet Planet." Lougee gained extensive pet knowledge and expertise in care and rehabilitation, built a farm, and cares for rescue animals from small to large. She holds a bachelor's degree in management.