×

How to Hang a Sign Up on the Door

If you want a sign to really get attention, consider hanging it on a door. It would be pretty tough to use the door without at least glancing at the sign, so it makes it an ideal location for your sign. You can even hang the sign without the worries of damaging your doorway. If you don't take the time to hang the sign properly, though, it can damage the door and sign.

Glass and Steel Doors

Your door sign can say anything you wish.
  1. Buy suction cups rated for the weight of your sign. Buy two or four. depending on the support you need.

  2. Plug in a hot glue gun and let it heat up. Do not attempt to use the glue gun before it finishes heating or the glue may not work as well as you hoped.

  3. Lay your sign face down on a surface. Dab some hot glue onto either the bottom left corner of the sign (if you will attach four suction cups) or one to the center at the bottom of the sign (if you will only attach two suction cups).

  4. Press the suction cup to the wet hot glue (as long as the cup part faces outward) and hold it in place until it dries. Add three more drops of hot glue to each corner of the sign if you will use four suction cups or another drop of hot glue to the top center of the sign if you will only attach two suction cups. Attach a suction cup to each spot of glue.

  5. Press the sign's back to the door. Press over each individual suction cup so you're sure they stick fully. Watch the sign for a moment to ensure it will not fall.

Wooden Doors

  1. Hold your sign flush against the door. Hold a level atop the sign to ensure it's straight.

  2. Set down the level and draw a light outline of the sign. This helps you remember where the sign should sit and what angle you need to hang it at to keep it level.

  3. Ask a friend or family member to hold the sign for you. Show them the lines so they know where the sign should settle.

  4. Drill a hole into the upper right hand corner of the sign and straight into the door. Do the same with the upper left hand corner of the sign.

  5. Wipe away the metal and wood shavings left by your drilling.

About the Author

Shae Hazelton is a professional writer whose articles are published on various websites. Her topics of expertise include art history, auto repair, computer science, journalism, home economics, woodworking, financial management, medical pathology and creative crafts. Hazelton is working on her own novel and comic strip while she works as a part-time writer and full time Medical Coding student.