Correct Bar Stool Height

Bar stools are an essential addition to any house with a counter bar.

You want bar stools to be the correct height to make sitting at your bar comfortable.You want bar stools to be the correct height to make sitting at your bar comfortable.
The stools allow your guests to sit comfortably while you prepare them beverages and regale them with stories. Bar stools will only be comfortable for your guests if they are the correct height, however. If they're too high, there won't be room for your guests' legs. If the stools are too low, guests will be reaching up to the bar. When purchasing bar stools, measure properly to get the right height.

Measure the distance from your floor to the underside of your bar's counter. Typically the bar will have a lip that hangs out a few inches from the base. Measure to the underside of this lip. Write the distance down.

Subtract 12 inches from the distance you wrote down. This will give you the optimal height for the seat portion of your bar stool. For example, if the distance between your bar and floor is 36 inches, you should purchase a bar stool with a seat no higher than 24 inches.

Measure your desired bar stool by placing the bar stool on the floor and finding the distance from the floor to the top of the seat portion of the stool. If it matches your optimal height, you have your bar stool.

Test your bar stools. Place the bar stools in front of your bar and have several people sit in them. Make sure everyone is seated comfortably. If the stools do not quite fit, add or subtract a couple of inches off of your desired height.

Things You Will Need

  • Tape measure

Tip

  • Measure your bar three times: once on each end and once in the middle. This will let you know if your either your bar or floor isn't straight. If the measurements are different, you can compensate by buying stools of different heights.

About the Author

Michael Scott is a freelance writer and professor of justice studies at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah, and is a former prosecutor. Scott has a J.D. from Emory University and is a member of the Utah State Bar. He has been freelancing since June 2009, and his articles have been published on eHow.com and Travels.com.