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Acu-Rite 00593W Directions

The Acu-Rite 00593W is a clock for your home or business that displays the current temperature, humidity and air pressure. It also has an atomic clock feature that automatically updates the time by using a satellite signal. The Acu-Rite 00593W is popularly known as a weather clock. Because most of its functions are automated, setting up and using the 00593W is a straightforward task.


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  1. Slide the battery cover off the back of the unit and insert the two AA batteries into the compartment. Slide the battery cover back on.
  2. Grasp the edge of the back cover of the remote sensor and pull rearward to expose the battery compartment. Insert the three AAA batteries into the compartment.
  3. Push the "TX" button inside the compartment, and then push the "C/F" button to choose "Celsius" or "Fahrenheit," whichever temperature unit you want to use. Push the rear cover back on to reattach it.
  4. Push and hold the "-" button on the main unit until "P" displays on the screen. You'll now set the time zone so the system can automatically set the clock. The screen will begin cycling between the time zones. Push the "Set" button when the correct time zone appears.
  5. Push the "Set" button on the unit to synchronize the clock. After a few seconds, the time will show on the main unit's display. If you have trouble synchronizing the clock, or if you simply want to manually set the clock, push and hold "Set" for three seconds. Push the "+" and "-" buttons to adjust the selected digit. Push "Set" to move on to the next digit. The date also appears in this sequence. Push "Set" when you are finished setting all the values.
  6. Push and hold "Alarm" for three seconds to program an alarm. Push the "+" or "-" buttons to choose the alarm time, and then push "Alarm" to confirm.

Things You Will Need

  • Two AA batteries
  • Two AAA batteries

About the Author

Leonardo R. Grabkowski has been writing professionally for more than four years. Grabkowski attended college in Oregon. He builds websites on the side and has a slight obsession with Drupal, Joomla and Wordpress.