×
x

How to Clean Lucite

Lucite is a brand name of acrylic plastic. It typically is formed into sheets or cylinders for general construction and craft use, but it can also be used to make a variety of household items such as table legs, chairs, lamp bases and cabinet handles.

Things You Will Need

  • 2 soft, non-absorbent, lint-free, non-abrasive cloths
  • Hot water
  • Dish soap
  • Bucket
  • Plastic polish (optional)

Lucite is a brand name of acrylic plastic.  It typically is formed into sheets or cylinders for general construction and craft use, but it can also be used to make a variety of household items such as table legs, chairs, lamp bases and cabinet handles.

Lucite is a durable substance that is typically clear and colorless, but it can be made in different opacities and colors.  The main drawback of Lucite, as well as other acrylics, is that can be fairly easily scratched.

However, with proper cleaning, you won't damage the flawless surface. 

  1. Prepare a bucket of hot water with a bit of liquid dish soap squirted in and agitated into a lather.
  2. Use the soft cloth to apply the hot, soapy water to the Lucite. Or, use the plastic polish according to package directions.
  3. Rinse well with warm water.
  4. Dry with another soft cloth.
  5. Warning

    It is recommended that you use disposable cloths and use them only once. Reused cloths may harbor fragments of dirt and debris, which may be invisible to the naked eye but can cause scratching on your Lucite. Once the scratch happens, the damage is done.

Things You Will Need

  • 2 soft, non-absorbent, lint-free, non-abrasive cloths
  • Hot water
  • Dish soap
  • Bucket
  • Plastic polish (optional)

Warning

  • It is recommended that you use disposable cloths and use them only once. Reused cloths may harbor fragments of dirt and debris, which may be invisible to the naked eye but can cause scratching on your Lucite. Once the scratch happens, the damage is done.

About the Author

Shelley Kishpaugh has written numerous articles for Demand Studios and Helium on a wide variety of topics, and she is currently writing a children's book. Kishpaugh received a B.S. in psychology from the University of Colorado and has been writing professionally since 2007.