How to Change a Genie Garage Door Dip Switch

Changing dip-switch codes on Genie openers must be done correctly or your remote controls will not operate the door.
Genie openers manufactured before 1996 use dip switches instead of the rolling code technology used today. Periodic changing of your remote codes help give a little extra security. When changing codes, it is necessary to have all of your remote controls with you. This is because the dip switches on the opener and the remotes must match exactly for the opener to operate with the remotes.

Step 1

Place the step ladder under the Genie garage door opener. Unplug the power cord to prevent accidental operation while changing the dip switch codes. Remove the lens cover securing the screws with a Phillips screwdriver.

Step 2

Pull the lens cover away and find the line of white dip switches on the upper-left front of the unit. Some Genie openers have an external receiver above the opener with wires going to the opener motor. There is a small door on the bottom that slides open with your thumb to access the dip switches.

Step 3

Press down on the battery cover of the remote control with your thumb and slide it off the remote. The dip switches are above the battery.

Step 4

Push each dip switch on the receiver or motor, up or down with a pen or small flat-head screwdriver. The dip switches only move in two different positions.

Step 5

Move the dip switches on all of the remote controls to the exact position of the dip switches on the receiver. Place the covers back onto the remote and the receiver. If your dip switches are on the front of the motor, place the lens cover back onto the motor and secure with the screws.

Step 6

Plug the power cord into the ceiling outlet. Operate the Genie opener with the remote.

Things You Will Need

  • Step ladder
  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Pen or small flat-head screwdriver

Tips

  • If the remote doesn't work, one or more of the individual dip switches do not match between the remote control and receiver. Recheck the dip switches and correct the positioning as necessary.
  • Program the keyless keypad entry in the same manner.

About the Author

Kenneth Crawford is a freelance writer with more than 10 years of experience. His work has appeared in both print and online publications, including "The American Chronicle." Crawford holds an associate degree in business administration from Commonwealth College.