How to Adjust the Gas Pressure on Water Heaters

Hot water heaters that rely on gas are fed through a series of supply lines and ball valves that control the flow of the gas.
It's important to make sure the gas valve is fully open on hot water heater lines.It's important to make sure the gas valve is fully open on hot water heater lines.
Almost all hot water heaters self-regulate the amount of pressure that's released into the heating element. This means the amount of gas pressure normally cannot be regulated manually. However, the ball valve that releases gas into the supply line can become stuck in a part-open, part-closed position, which can reduce the performance of the gas. Making sure the ball valve is fully open will ensure the best possible performance from your hot water heater.

Step 1

Locate the ball valve along the gas line that feeds into your water heater. The gas line is usually colored yellow and the ball valve will likely be red or blue. Use a flashlight to see in dark areas.

Step 2

Note the position of the ball valve. If the valve is turned to the fully "On" position, there is nothing more you can do to adjust the gas pressure. If the valve is not turned all the way on, but hot water is being produced, turn the valve all the way to the "On" position.

Step 3

If the valve is partially in the "On" position but there is no hot water, turn the valve to the "Off" position and wait five minutes. Turn the valve to the "On" position, then turn the gas valve on the hot water heater to the "Pilot" position. Press down on the "Ignition" button until you see the pilot flame inside the heater. Turn the gas valve to the "Run" or "On" position. The gas is now fully on.

Things You Will Need

  • Flashlight

Warning

  • Always follow the manufacturer's recommended instructions for working with gas regulators.

About the Author

Heath Robert has been a professional writer since 2001. Covering news, politics and local communities, he has worked for daily newspapers across Colorado, including the "Columbine Courier" and the "Colorado Statesman." Robert holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in journalism and political science.