How to Replace the Wood Around Windows

Learn how to replace the rotting wood around exterior home windows.

Remove Rotten or Soft Decaying Wood and Replace with Pressure-Treated Wood

RED FISH CANNERY © Joy PrescottRED FISH CANNERY © Joy Prescott
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Locate all the rotten or soft decaying wood around all your exterior windows.

Using the pry bar, gently removed rotted wood pieces, being careful not to harm the window or the remaining wood or home exterior that you want to keep.

Measure the rotten wood pieces and cut replacement pieces that are the exact same length, width, height and thickness.

Make sure that the replacement wood is pressure treated, which will reduce the wood rot problem in the future. It also might be preferable to paint the replacement pieces before installation.

Nail or screw the replacement pieces back into place around the window.

It might be a good idea to drill a pilot hole to prevent the new perfectly measured pieces from splitting. If the piece of replacement pressure-treated wood has not been painted, put a coat of paint on it after installation. Follow up with a second coat of paint.

If there are any small rot spots that are too small to warrant an entire piece of wood replacement or that are made of a historic piece that must be left due to conservation rules, dig out the small rotten wood with a screwdriver or small pry bar. Then fill the hole with wood filler. After wood filler is dry, paint to match the rest of the home exterior.

Things You Will Need

  • Pry bar
  • Hammer
  • Nails or screws
  • Drill
  • Ladder
  • Replacement pressure-treated wood
  • Saw
  • Matching paint for trim

Tip

  • There are products to kill wood rot or fungus that can be applied to wood before painting or applied to spots that have been dug out before they are filled with wood filler. If you are replacing large or long sections, especially on a second story or higher, it would be advisable to get the assistance of another person.

Warning

  • Use safety eye wear when necessary and use safety precautions when operating a saw or climbing ladders.

About the Author

Heather Inks is a social entrepreneur who educates on improving communities and the world. She is an educator, writer, photographer, artist and model who has taught K6-12th grade and public educators. Inks is a life coach specializing in personal, career, educational, dating, health and fitness, and gifted children issues. She has been educated at fine universities including graduate work at Stetson University.