How to Repair a Cast Iron Skillet

A cast iron skillet is the basic utensil of a good kitchen.

A cast iron skillet will work even better than a non-stick pan once it is repaired.A cast iron skillet will work even better than a non-stick pan once it is repaired.
It can withstand the scorching of forgotten food or the mishandling of the new cook and produce the perfect fried egg without any special coating. Even after years of neglect, you can take the cast iron skillet and repair it to look black and shiny and ready for several more years of cooking.

Clean an old decrepit cast iron pan by placing it in a self-cleaning oven on the shortest cycle. The high temperature will burn off any food bits and grease that have been caked on over the years. Expect the burning process to produce some fumes so keep the stove exhaust fan running.

Cool the pan slowly in the oven for an hour or more. Once it has cooled enough to handle, coat it with a thick layer of lard. Cover every part of the pan, including the handle, using your hand or a rag.

Bake the pan at 500 degrees for an hour to allow the grease to carbonize or burn onto the pan. Again, keep the stove exhaust fan running to blow out any fumes from the burning lard. Cool the pan to room temperature.

Wipe out the pan with a paper towel to get rid of any blackened soot. Make sure to wipe all the surfaces, not just the inside, or you may find the pan leaving black smudges everywhere you set it. Use the pan as normal, cleaning it up with regular dish soap, if necessary and always drying it or hanging it up to dry to prevent it from rusting. After a few weeks of cooking, your pan will develop a nice smooth almost non-stick surface and will turn black and smooth.

Things You Will Need

  • Self cleaning oven
  • Lard
  • Cotton rag

Warning

  • Never place a hot cast iron pan in cold water or it will crack.

About the Author

Maryland resident Heide Braley is a professional writer who contributes to a variety of websites. She has focused more than 10 years of research on botanical and garden articles and was awarded a membership to the Society of Professional Journalists. Braley has studied at Pennsylvania State University and Villanova University.