Whirpool Gas Stove Self-Cleaning Instructions

At one time, only high-end models of gas and electric ranges had a self-cleaning oven.
Many of today’s ranges offer the self-cleaning oven as a standard feature; the Whirlpool gas stove is no exception. By following simple self-cleaning instructions, you will have a clean oven whether you use it daily to make casseroles or once a month to bake a cake. Even the toughest spills then take only minutes to wipe away, once the cleaning cycle is complete.

Step 1

Check the door seal. It must be in good condition before you can efficiently operate the self-cleaning cycle. Do not bend or move the seal.

Step 2

Remove everything from inside the Whirlpool gas stove. This includes the oven racks and the broiler pans. You may clean them by hand, while the oven cleans itself. Because the oven gets extremely hot, remove everything from the range’s storage drawer. Take everything off the top of the range, as well.

Step 3

Wipe out any large particles of food from the floor of the oven. Clean the door edge with a soft sponge. This area of the oven doesn’t get hot enough for the self-cleaning cycle to clean it.

Step 4

Close the door. If the model has a manual lock, slide it into position. Set the oven to “Self-Clean.” Set the amount of time for cleaning by raising or lowering the time from the default three hours: A lightly soiled oven may only take two hours to clean; a heavily soiled oven may need four hours to clean properly.

Step 5

Allow the oven plenty of time to cool before opening the door. Use a damp sponge to wipe up the ash that remains from the food cleaned during the cleaning cycle.

Step 6

Return the racks and broiler pans to the oven.

Things You Will Need

  • Sponge

Tips

  • Don’t wait to clean the oven. It’s easier to remove residue if there is less mess to clean.
  • Clean the oven on days that you can open a window to help reduce heat, smells and smoke.
  • The Whirlpool oven’s temperature must be below 400 degrees Fahrenheit before you can set the self-cleaning cycle.

About the Author

Denise Brown is an education professional who wanted to try something different. Two years and more than 500 articles later, she's enjoying her freelance writing experience for online resources such as Work.com and other online information sites. Brown holds a master's degree in history education from Truman State University.