How to Cut Schedule 80 PVC

General PVC pipe used in the household installation of sewer and vent lines are made of Schedule 40 PVC.

Schedule 80 PVC pipe has thicker walls than Schedule 40 PVC.Schedule 80 PVC pipe has thicker walls than Schedule 40 PVC.
The thickness of the walls of this pipe are strong enough to stand on and not distort the pipe's shape. Schedule 80 PVC pipe has the same outside diameter as Schedule 40 pipe, but the inside diameter is smaller. This makes the walls of the pipe thicker than Schedule 40 PVC pipe. Though hacksaws or handsaws can be used to cut Schedule 40 pipe, a miter saw is best used for Schedule 80 pipe to create straighter and cleaner cuts.

Mark the Schedule 80 PVC pipe at the point where it needs to be cut. Pull the miter saw's locking handle so it rests on the 90-degree setting. Tighten the handle at this setting by turning it clockwise.

Rest the PVC pipe on the base of the miter saw, pushing it against the back stop. Pull the blade down to make sure it lines up with the mark on the pipe.

Hold the pipe firmly with one hand, at least a foot from the blade, and while squeezing the trigger, pull the saw blade's handle down so it cuts through the pipe. Push the blade's handle back up and away from the pipe, and remove the pipe from the miter saw.

Scrape away any burrs or plastic fragments from the cut pipe end, using a tradesman's knife.

Things You Will Need

  • Marker pen
  • Powered miter saw
  • Tradesman's knife

Tips

  • Notice the circular saw blade has a plastic safety cover that will move automatically to allow the blade to cut through the pipe.
  • If the Schedule 80 PVC pipe is already installed, use a portable power saw to make the cut. Take time getting a firm footing, and make sure the cut is straight at 90 degrees to the pipe.

Warning

  • Always wear eye goggles when cutting through the pipe.

About the Author

Steve Sloane started working as a freelance writer in 2007. He has written articles for various websites, using more than a decade of DIY experience to cover mostly construction-related topics. He also writes movie reviews for Inland SoCal. Sloane holds a Bachelor of Arts in creative writing and film theory from the University of California, Riverside.