How to Divide a Studio Apartment

A studio apartment, or efficiency apartment, has one large room for living, eating and sleeping.

How to Divide a Studio Apartment

The bathroom is the only separate room in the apartment. Defining living spaces makes the place more attractive and livable. Whether you're using furniture placement or actual room dividers, here are some creative ways to divide a studio apartment.

Use bookcases to separate the sleeping area from the living area. Cases with closed backs allow for more privacy. Shelving with open backs allows light to create a create an illusion of space.

Folding Screen by Sokol Design

Use folding screens. Screens can be moved to create different spaces as your fancy suits you and can be stored when you need more entertaining space.

Paint the sleeping and dining areas different colors. This defines them without adding extra furniture to the space.

Buy solid area rugs of different colors. Put one in the living space and another in the sleeping area. The colors draw your eye to each space and create the illusion of separate rooms.

Group your living room furniture away from the walls around a focal point like a fireplace or entertainment center. A grouping clearly defines the living space by moving traffic flow to around the edges rather than straight through. The virtual hallways that result suggest more space.

Create a suggestion of walls by hanging curtains, bamboo blinds or fabric panels from the ceiling. If the space is right, use a heavy-duty tension rod to hang the curtains. Otherwise, hang two hooks from the ceiling and use a wooden dowel or fancy curtain rod to hang them.

Panel Track by Decorators Corner

Install a panel track on the ceiling and hang rice paper screens from it. Rice paper screens diffuse light while creating a clearly defined space.

Things You Will Need

  • Screens
  • Fabric
  • Rugs
  • Paint
  • Bookcases

Tip

  • Use mirrors on opposite walls to increase light and make the room appear more spacious.

Warning

  • If you're a renter, check with your landlord to see if you're allowed to paint or attach anything to the walls.

About the Author

Meg Jernigan has been writing for more than 30 years. She specializes in travel, cooking and interior decorating. Her offline credits include copy editing full-length books and creating marketing copy for nonprofit organizations. Jernigan attended George Washington University, majoring in speech and drama.