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How to Convert a Toilet to a Urinal

For some men and boys, urinating into a conventional toilet can present problems. Physically handicapped men may have difficulty assuming the correct position for accurate aim of their urine stream.

Simple conversion kits turn an ordinary toilet into a urinal.

For some men and boys, urinating into a conventional toilet can present problems.  Physically handicapped men may have difficulty assuming the correct position for accurate aim of their urine stream.

Young boys learning correct urination habits also may have difficulties with their aim, resulting in urine spatter on floors, walls and the outside of the toilet.  Several manufacturers offer help with these issues through kits that easily convert an ordinary toilet into a urinal.

  1. Check that all parts of the conversion kit are included in the package. Kits consist of a urine shield that stands up at the back of the toilet bowl and may include attachment fittings for the urine shield and a protective mat for the floor in front of the toilet.
  2. Wipe clean the toilet rim and the outside of the bowl. Lift the toilet seat.
  3. Clip the attachment fittings onto the bowl rim or fasten on the outside of the rim with suction cups on each side. With some models, the urine shield clips directly onto the bowl rim without separate attachment fittings.
  4. Position the urine shield at the back of the toilet bowl where the urine stream can strike the unit. Snap the urine shield onto the attachment fittings or clip the urine shield to the bowl rim. Check that urine will run down into the toilet bowl.
  5. Lay down the floor mat if one is provided.
  6. Remove the urine shield and lower the seat to use the stool as a regular toilet. Some urine shields swing down over the front of the bowl. Others lift off the bowl for storage to the side.

Things You Will Need

  • Toilet-to-urinal conversion kit

About the Author

Herb Kirchhoff has more than three decades of hands-on experience as an avid garden hobbyist and home handyman. Since retiring from the news business in 2008, Kirchhoff takes care of a 12-acre rural Michigan lakefront property and applies his experience to his vegetable and flower gardens and home repair and renovation projects.

Photo Credits

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  • Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images